General Data Protection Regulation Top Ten Issues

The ink is barely dry on the draft, but the  EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) looks set to change the regulatory environment for personal information not just in the EU, but around the world. Its aim is to create a legal infrastructure for the use of personal data that is fit for purpose, both today and in the future.

The GDPR was designed to increase legal certainty with regards to information flows both within the EU’s borders and beyond. It also introduces stronger consumer protections, with requirements for greater transparency and accountability about how data is used by businesses, not-for-profits and governments alike.

This is intended to give individuals increased trust in data practices.  Consumer research in the last few years has shown consistently high levels of concern and lack of trust in this area, and this is believed to be a potential brake on the future growth of digital technologies.

However, in order to achieve these goals the GDPR does come with some stings in its tail. It places much greater requirements on businesses to communicate effectively with customers, and obtain much clearer consent for the use of their data.  Organisations also have to provide customer choice mechanisms, and there is a greater emphasis on documenting data processing activity. And then of course there are the fines.

At over 200 pages it is a very wide ranging instrument.  However, for those who haven’t had time to read it yet, these are what we think the top 10 issues for most organisations will be.

1.  A broader definition of Personal Data

As we predicted earlier, the scope of what constitutes ‘personal data’ has explicitly been broadened to include any information ‘relating to’ an individual. This specifically includes ‘online identifiers’ so cookies and the advertising IDs seen in the mobile eco-system will be caught up, along with anything that contributes to identifying an individual, or links to such identifying information. This has some widespread implications for online tracking in particular.

2.  A higher bar for consent

Whilst the final text shied away from explicit consent as a requirement, except when special categories of (sensitive) data are concerned, there is still much emphasis on gaining consent through active user mechanisms like tick boxes.

A key part of the test of the validity of consent is whether consumers understand what they are agreeing to, and are given a meaningful choice. There is also a significant shift in the burden of proof.  You will need to be able to provide evidence that you obtained consent from specific data subjects, which is going to require much better record keeping for many organisations.

3.  Data Protection Officers

Although not a universal requirement, many organisations will be required to appoint a Data Protection Officer (DPO) to oversee data uses and ensure compliance with the law. They will be mandatory in the public sector, but for private sector organisations the key test will be whether the organisation is involved in “systematic monitoring of data subjects on a large scale“, however it is not clear at this time how ‘large scale’ will be interpreted.

Earlier, more detailed, requirements for the skills and experience of the DPO and guarantees over their employment, have been dropped but a key issue in the short to medium term will be a lack of the right people to fill such roles.

DPOs however can be outsourced, which may create a market for new services, especially to cater for the needs of smaller businesses.  The DPO responsibilities can also be given to someone alongside other work within the organisation, as long as this does not create a conflict of interest.  So training existing staff into the role could be a viable option for many.

4.  Transparency and Accountability

The GDPR scraps the need for controllers to register with their Data Protection Authority (DPA), but replaces this with a requirement to both better inform data subjects about practices and rights, and to keep records that can be made available on request – such as in the event of a data breach or a compliance complaint.  Such records are about demonstrating that the organisation has thought through the impact of its systems and processes, and made informed choices about how to comply with the GDPR.  The Data Protection or Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) is one example of such documentation.  It is intended that a PIA will show that an organisation has considered the risks associated with its particular personal data practices, and taken reasonable steps to control or mitigate them.

There are also new requirements on the level of detail that organisations must provide to data subjects about their practices, as well as a need to make sure that this information is both accessible and easy to understand. In particular there is a need to explain the logic behind decisions made on the basis of analysing personal data – which may have particular significance in some sectors that have relied on such processes being largely secret. Organisations are also expected to inform subjects about their rights and how to exercise them.

5.  Data Protection by Design and Default

Although references to this have been cut back in comparison with earlier versions of the text, the GDPR contains requirements that the design of systems and processes are required to give consideration to compliance with the principles of data protection. Particular emphasis is placed on the ideas of only collecting data necessary to fulfil specific purposes, discarding it when it is no longer required, and protecting data subject rights.

It also sets up the possibility for the development of certifications and codes of practice that organisations can follow to help meet these requirements.  Keep an eye for these as they develop.  In particular we expect DPAs to get involved in this area.  They will be losing their registration fees and therefore needing new sources of income.  In the UK the Information Commissioners Office (ICO) has already been developing this idea, so expect it to continue. Trade bodies are also likely to have a role to play here.

6.  The Right to Erasure and Data Portability

These new data subject rights are likely to pose challenges for many organisations. The right to erasure is a clarification of the much talked about ‘right to be forgotten’.   Although the circumstances when the right can be exercised have been made clearer, the balancing against other rights and obligations is still needed.

The right to have a copy of your data in a machine readable form to transfer to another provider may be difficult at first, but it could also lead to better systems interoperability in the longer term – which is already a growing technology trend.  In particular this provision may facilitate the development of the market for ‘personal data stores’, an idea that has long been talked about, but not yet fully realised as providers have struggled with sustainable and scalable business models.

7.  Removal of Subject Access Request Fees

Data subjects have a right to know whether or not an organisation is processing their personal data, what that data is and the purposes of the processing.  The GDPR removes the ability to charge an upfront fee for providing such information, and there is a risk requests will increase as a result of this, pushing up costs.  Current allowable fees don’t exactly cover the cost of  a Subject Access Request (SAR), but are seen as a deterrent to time wasters.  If companies are no longer able to charge fees, it is feared this could open the floodgates to many more SARs.

Companies will be allowed to charge for subsequent copies of the same data, which may reduce the risk of this to some extent. However, it may be worth investing in making sure you can respond to such requests as efficiently as possible, which will not be easy in many cases.

8.  Reporting Data Breaches

Data controllers will be required to report data breaches to their DPA, unless it is unlikely to represent a risk to the rights and freedoms of the individuals concerned. However this qualification may be difficult to judge, so in many cases, it will be safer to notify. The notice must be made within 72 hours of becoming aware of it, unless there are exceptional circumstances, which will have to be justified.

Where the risks to individuals is high, then the data subjects themselves will also need to be notified, although a specific time scale is not specified for this.  It is also worth noting that the DPA can instruct an organisation to inform data subjects if they haven’t already, so we can expect to see further guidance on the circumstances when it would be correct to do so.

9.  Fines

The GDPR very deliberately raises the bar in terms of the ability for DPAs to issue fines for breaches of the rules.  They can go as high as 4% of global turnover.  Not only are these designed to ensure data protection becomes a board level issue, by taking into account worldwide revenues, they seek to side step attempts by multinationals to engage in fine-avoidance business structures.

It is also worth noting that fines can be levied without the necessity to demonstrate harm – although the largest ones will likely be reserved for cases where data subjects have directly suffered damages.

10.  Data Processor Responsibilities

Organisations that only process data on instructions from their client are not directly covered by the current data protection regime.  Their actions were assumed to be governed by agreement with the customer who would be the data controller, and therefore directly responsible for the actions of the processor. However this all changes under the GDPR, and processors now have direct legal obligations and responsibilities.

In particular this means that processors can in certain circumstances be held directly liable and be required to pay compensation to a data subject. It will therefore become very important to establish the contractual relationships and liabilities of the different parties in a controller/processor relationship, and the costs of some services by processors may rise to offset additional risks and insurance costs.

 

We hope you find this useful.  In future posts we will look at more details of what you can do to prepare, as well as looking into each of these areas in more detail.

In the mean time, if you have any questions and would like to know more about how the GDPR might effect your business, do get in touch and we will be happy to help.

Posted in Data Breach, Data Protection Regulation, Enforcement, Legislation, Privacy by Design, Privacy Impact Assessment, Privacy Policies and Notices, Right to be Forgotten.

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